Publication – “We are All Servants”: The Diversity of Service in Premodern Europe (1000-1700), ed. by Isabelle Cochelin and Diane Wolfthal

Service permeated premodern Europe and was a key concept for defining relationships. Unlike earlier volumes on service, “We Are All Servants” explores simultaneously the medieval and early modern periods, and considers service and servants through multiple discourses and in a wide variety of contexts, from courts to anchorholds, and including monastic and hospital settings throughout western Europe. The volume brings together an interdisciplinary and international team of scholars who study a highly diverse group of servants: male and female, young and old, lay and religious, of both high and low status, with few or great expectations for their future.

Table des matières :

Isabelle Cochelin – “Introduction”

1. Arnaud Montreuil – “Qui pour armes servoient: Service and Knighting in the Vernacular Courtly Literature of Twelfth- and Thirteenth-century France and England”
2. Kim M. Phillips – “Breast into Service: Wet Nurses in Late Medieval England”
3. Jiting Chu – “Accompaniment as Service: The Ladies-in-waiting of Women of the High Nobility in the late Middle Ages in French and Flemish illumination”
4. Rolf Strøm-Olsen – “The Part-Time Courtier: The Periodic Contract System at the Court of Burgundy”
5. Laura Moncion – “Between Servant and Disciple: Recluses’ Attendants in Three Medieval Rules for Recluses”
6. Adam J. Davis – “Servants and Service in Twelfth- and Thirteenth-Century French Hospitals”
7. Kate E. Bush – “Maids of the Handmaidens: Serving Sisters in Clarissan Communities, c. 1250–1550”
8. Emma Gabe – “Lay Sisters and the Discourse of Service in the Late Medieval Sister-Books”
9. Isabel Harvey – “From Servants to Converse Nuns: Tridentine Enclosure and Economic Reform in Convents of the Papal States under Clement VIII”
10. Lucie Laumonier – “Domestic Service in Late Medieval Languedoc: The Household and the Family”
11. Francine Michaud – “The Meaning of Servanthood in Private Households: The Case of Thirteenth- and Fourteenth-Century Marseille”
12. Jeremy Goldberg – “‘For his good and faithful service’: Being a Servant in Later Medieval England”
13. Elena Brizio – “Friends or Enemies? Sienese Servant Women in the Fifteenth and Sixteenth Centuries”
14. Marlee Couling – “‘She Would Long Since Have Been Starved’: Networks of Support between Mistresses and Female Servants in Seventeenth-Century England”
15. Bert Roest – “The Lay Servant in Franciscan Homiletics and Household Management Books”
16. Sarah Pech-Pelletier – “The Evolution of the Notion of “Service” in Thirteenth- to Sixteenth-Century Spain: Servants, Enslaved Persons, and Masters in the Eyes of the Law”
17. Diane Wolfthal – “The Unseen Servant in Late Medieval and Early Modern Art”
18. Mathilde Legeay – “Representations of the Female Servant in the Italian Religious Paintings of the Seicento: Between Reality and Fiction”
19. Elizabeth S. Cohen – “Varieties of Servants in Premodern Europe: Some Thematic Connections”

Informations pratiques :

“We are All Servants”: The Diversity of Service in Premodern Europe (1000-1700), ed. by Isabelle Cochelin and Diane Wolfthal, Centre for Renaissance and Reformations Studies, 2022. 632 pp., 67 ill.
$59.95. Shipping: $5.99 CAD to North America, $21.99 CAD to Europe, $24.99 to other international addresses; prices may vary for bulk orders. ISBN 978-0-7727-2228-7 (print).

Source : Centre for Renaissance and Reformations Studies

A propos RMBLF

Réseau des médiévistes belges de langue française
Cet article a été publié dans Publications. Ajoutez ce permalien à vos favoris.