Appel à contribution – Call for Papers for Special Sessions at the International Congress on Medieval Studies (ICMS 2019) and the International medieval Congress (IMC 2019)

May 9 to 12, 2019 – Western Michigan University

July 1 – 4, 2019 – University of Leeds

Redefining the Monster

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The proposed session will discuss and debate on the various definitions of the concept of the “monster.” Defining the monster is a challenge. Monsters and monstrosity-related aspects have been topics of academic research either connected to identity or cross-cultural encounters, explored as ‘others’ in the context of voyages (real-imagined), as heritage from Antiquity, as races reflected in travellers’ reports inserted into Western art, philosophy, and theology.

What is a monster? What is monstrosity? How is the monster conceptualized by a given community? Can one define it or does the monster define itself? Does it offer any self-description? Did the medieval man write about monsters and how does this define the monster from a cultural perspective? Where and what is the “border” between human, “other,” and monster? This session seeks original research which investigates medieval scholarly debates in philosophical, theological, political, literary, visual contexts and/or sources in order to (re)define the concept of the monster/monstrosity. Reinterpretations of previous definitions are welcome in a debate on re-visualizing medieval monsters.

This session also aims to bring the intellectual outcome of these sessions into the attention of the general public by publishing the proceedings of the debates in the series “Picturing Women in the Middle Ages and Early Modernity” at Trivent Publishing, Budapest, Hungary.

Please submit a 250-word proposal for a 15-20 minute paper presentation by September 15th, 2018.

Deformis Formositas ac Formosa Deformitas. The Ugliness of Beauty and the Beauty of Ugliness: Materializing Ugliness and Deformity in the Middle Ages

The proposed session will discuss and debate on the various definitions and functions of the concept of “ugliness.” What is ugliness and how is it conceptualized? This session seeks original research which investigates debates on the concept of “ugliness” in various contexts:

Spiritual/physical/material ugliness;
Paradoxical nature of ugliness/irony/allegorical discourse;
Emotions and ugliness;
Functional aspects/Contrasts/Status and ugliness;
Didactic/moralistic functions;
Gendered aspects: ugliness belonging to other creatures;
Description/nature/character of ugliness;
Symbolism and patterns of transmission;
Comparative aspects of medieval beauty and ugliness;
Beauty within the context of ugliness in visual and textual sources

This session also aims to bring its intellectual outcomes into the attention of the general public by publishing, contextually, the proceedings of the debates in the series “Picturing the Middle Ages and Early Modernity” at Trivent Publishing, Budapest, Hungary.

Please submit a working title and a 250-word proposal for a 15-20 minute paper presentation by September 15th, 2018, the latest.

Visualizing Women in the Apocrypha

The proposed session is devoted to the construction and visualization of women as reflected in apocryphal sources with the aim of bringing into attention this generally neglected topic/sources which seem to be underrepresented. The existent literature, in the general field of apocrypha, indicates that there is space for debate on issues connected to gender in these sources.

Research in this field concentrates mostly on the textual tradition and transmission of apocryphal texts, yet aspects concerning the construction and function of women and gender still need to be addressed. Hence, we seek to examine issues related to the status, function, and identity of women who may be models and/or background figures in fields pertaining, but not limited to: theology, religious studies, textual studies, manuscript studies, art history in a transdisciplinary perspective.

Original work and research is welcomed starting from the Late Antiquity to the Late Middle Ages, both in the East and West. The sessions refer to the concept of ‘apocrypha/on’ as movable texts whose composition does not end in the fourth – fifth centuries in the context of the establishment and closing of the canon. This permits to address issues concerning the evolution, transmission, adoptation, and adaptation of sources.

This session also aims to bring the intellectual outcome of these sessions into the attention of the general public by publishing the proceedings of the debates in the series “Picturing Women in the Middle Ages and Early Modernity” at Trivent Publishing, Budapest, Hungary.

Please submit a 250-word proposal for a 15-20 minute paper presentation by September 15th, 2018.

Apocryphal Iconography: Integration, Adaptation, and Church Tradition

Call for Papers for Session Proposal at the International Medieval Congress (IMC 2019), July 1 – 4, 2019, University of Leeds.

The proposed session is devoted to the integration and adaptation of apocryphal sources in the construction of medieval iconographies with the aim of bringing into attention this generally neglected and underrepresented field. Research in this field concentrates mostly on the textual tradition and transmission of apocryphal texts, yet certain aspects still need to be addressed, such as:

The construction and function of apocryphal iconographies;
The context of sources for artists due to lack of information on holy lives;
Apocryphal visual representations and church tradition;

Original work and research is welcomed starting from the Late Antiquity to Late Middle Ages, both in the East and West. The session refers to the concept of ‘apochrypha/on’ as movable texts whose composition does not end in the 4th-5th centuries in the context of the establishment and closing of the canon. This permits to address issues concerning the evolution, transmission, adoptation, and adaptation of sources.

This session also aims to bring its intellectual outcomes into the attention of the general public by publishing, contextually, the proceedings of the debates in the series “Picturing the Middle Ages and Early Modernity” at Trivent Publishing, Budapest, Hungary.

Please submit a working title and a 250-word proposal for a 15-20 minute paper presentation by September 15th, 2018, at the latest.

Contact information:

Andrea-Bianka Znorovszky, Ca’Foscari University, Venice, Italy
(andrea.znorovszky@unive.it)

Teodora C. Artimon, Trivent Publishing, Budapest, Hungary
(teodora.artimon@trivent-publishing.eu)

Contact information:

Andrea-Bianka Znorovszky, Ca’ Foscari University, Venice, Italy (andrea.znorovszky@unive.it)

Teodora C. Artimon, Trivent Publishing, Budapest, Hungary (teodora.artimon@trivent-publishing.eu)

Source : Medieval Art Research

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